Danielle Creenaune

Artists have languages. How we respond to a work of art depends on our own repertoire of non verbal languages and our particular ways of seeing.

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Looking at Danielle Creenaune’s imagery for the first time, we quickly recognise her language. Danielle has a heartfelt physical connection with the natural landscape, an active knowledge of art history and mastery over her chosen printing medium, lithography. She also shares the language of a select group of modern artists who abstract from the real to create hybrid landscapes which give a sensation of place without losing material reality.

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As a child Danielle spent her vacations camping throughout Australia’s wild national parks. The nuggets of her nature walks: twig, pond, bark, rock, remind us of the bush-scape in the paintings of the Australian artist, Sidney Nolan. They also remind us of another great 20c artist, Ivon Hitchens who painted the flat watery Sussex landscape. Yamou, a contemporary painter and ecologist from Morocco shares the same poetic language. The point is that these artists, scattered around the world, are connected by their deep rooted understanding of plant life and nuanced mark making. Whether painting in oils, house paint or printing ink, they transform the specifics of being in a particular time and place into a universal consciousness which connects back 41,000 years, to the first human drawings of plant life found in the Aboriginal rock shelters of north west Australia.

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Creenaune, like the modernists Ivon Hitchens, Henri Matisse, and way before them the original cave artists, makes a virtue of negative space. By isolating the forms from their background, her motifs dance in their own light. It is attestant to her skill that they never fall into symbolic or graphic representation.

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Many artists find their muse in the natural world. Danielle’s images arise from the memory of walking – first with her family in the Australian bush and now in the hills of Catalunya – sketching freely – endlessly exploring and refining her language.

What is Mokulito / Wood Lithography?

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Mokulito or Wood Lithography, is a form of printmaking based on principles of lithography using wood as a printing matrix instead of limestone. This technique was developed by professor Seishi Ozaku, in Japan in the 1970’s. Josef Budka and his daughter Ewa have realized further development of the process in Poland.

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To give a simplistic description of the technical process, a sanded plywood surface is drawn on with lithographic drawing materials. Once dry, a layer of gum arabic is applied to the wood as an etch and left to dry to be printed another day. The same lithographic principle that oil and water don’t mix applies. The gum arabic is washed out before printing and the matrix is ready to be printed in a similar way to traditional lithography keeping the surface damp, applying ink using a roller and running through the press.

Bushwalk With You II

Wood lithograph [Mokulito] + Chine Collé

52 x 40 cm

5/9

Quadern de Pedra

Stone Lithograph + Chine colle

40 x 45 cm

2/8

Halfway to Hesperia II

Lithograph

30 x 42.5 cm

8/8

Halfway to Hesperia I

Lithograph

30 x 42.5 cm

8/10

Terra Alta Series 1-8, 2018

Terra Alta I

Lithograph, Chine Colle

22 x 22 cm

Terra Alta II

Lithograph, Chine Colle

22 x 22 cm

Terra Alta III

Lithograph, Chine Colle

22 x 22 cm

Terra Alta IV

Lithograph, Chine Colle

22 x 22 cm

Terra Alta V

Lithograph, Chine Colle

22 x 22 cm

Terra Alta VI

Lithograph, Chine Colle

22 x 22 cm

Terra Alta VII

Lithograph, Chine Colle

22 x 22 cm

Terra Alta VIII

Lithograph, Chine Colle

22 x 22 cm

Lost & Found Series, 2016

Lost & Found II

Lithograph, Chine Colle

22 x 22 cm

Lost & Found III

Lithograph, Chine Colle

22 x 22 cm

Alta Mar Series, 2019

Alta Mar I,II,III

Indigo Pigment Dye on Japanese Paper

23 x 32 cm

Alta Mar VII, VIII, IX, X

Indigo Pigment Dye on Japanese Paper

21 x 21 cm

Travessa

Indigo Pigment Dye on Japanese Paper

50 x 70 cm

Transcend Series 1-12

Sugarlift & Aquatint Etching

28 x 38 cm

Edition of 10